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Want to heal faster? Get a cat!

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If you want to heal faster, maybe you should get a kitty cat.

According to the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, scientists have discovered that the purring of cats is a natural healing mechanism. This could explain why cats survive falling from high buildings and may have helped inspire the notion that cats have nine lives.

Scientists believe cats heal themselves with purring. You might benefit too.

Exposure to similar sound frequencies are known to promote bone density in humans.
Research suggests sound has healing properties. Body cavities and tissues have their own resonant frequencies and sound in the same ranges stimulate the respective organs to heal.

Knowing that human lungs resonate at around 39 Hz (in a fluid medium), scientists at Georgia Tech and Emory University found sound at that frequency to be beneficial to people with lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis.

Cats purr when content and when they are severely injured, frightened or giving birth. So if cats were purring only out of happiness they would not purr when injured, especially as purring requires energy — and an injured animal will generally not expend precious energy needed for healing on an activity not directly connected with survival.

It’s possible that the healing properties of purring may be linked to the fact that vibrational stimulation relieves suffering in 82% of persons suffering from acute and chronic pain. And generates new tissue growth, augments wound tissue strength, improves local circulation and oxygenation, reduces swelling and/or inhibits bacterial growth.

Veterinary orthopedic surgeons know that it is relatively easy it is to mend broken cat bones, as compared with dogs. In a study of “High Rise Syndrome” found in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 132 cases of cats falling from high-rise apartments was studied. The average fall was 5.5 storeys (55 feet). The record height for survival was 45 storeys. Ninety percent of the cats studied survived even though some had severe injuries.

More here: http://www.leaflady.org/purr.htm


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Published inlongevity research